WHY WE GREENLAND

An authentic Arctic eldorado… with nice weather!

Located in the high Arctic, Greenland is the world’s largest island. It covers an area similar to France, the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, and Italy combined. Yet the total population fits in a single large sports stadium. Almost the entire country is pure, unspoilt wilderness – an incredible playground for any nature lover, outdoor adventurer and photographer.

Greenland is shaped by ice. The Greenlandic ice sheet, up to 3km thick, covers over 80% of the island. It feeds massive glaciers which slide down towards the sea, calving huge amounts of spectacular icebergs. During the last ice ages, the glaciers carved their way through the current coastal mountain ranges, leaving a sensational coastal labyrinth of fjords and dramatic alpine mountain scenery behind.

Greenland is shaped by ice. The Greenlandic ice sheet, up to 3km thick, covers over 80% of the island. It feeds massive glaciers which slide down towards the sea, calving huge amounts of spectacular icebergs. During the last ice ages, the glaciers carved their way through the current coastal mountain ranges, leaving a sensational coastal labyrinth of fjords and dramatic alpine mountain scenery behind.

Seemingly lifeless at a first glance, both land and sea teem with wildlife. Reindeer and muskoxen graze through lush green valleys, countless birds nest on the tundra and cliffs overlooking the coast, and eagles and gyrfalcons circle through the crisp clear arctic skies. In the East and Northwest, polar bears roam along the coast, with Arctic foxes following their traces hoping for leftovers. The Arctic seas are a world of plenty – the nutrients carried by the meltwater rivers draining into the fjords are the catalyst of one of the richest marine ecosystems on earth – with large populations of sea mammals like seals, whales, and even the mythical narwhals, the unicorn of the North.

Seemingly lifeless at a first glance, both land and sea teem with wildlife. Reindeer and muskoxen graze through lush green valleys, countless birds nest on the tundra and cliffs overlooking the coast, and eagles and gyrfalcons circle through the crisp clear arctic skies. In the East and Northwest, polar bears roam along the coast, with Arctic foxes following their traces hoping for leftovers. The Arctic seas are a world of plenty – the nutrients carried by the meltwater rivers draining into the fjords are the catalyst of one of the richest marine ecosystems on earth – with large populations of sea mammals like seals, whales, and even the mythical narwhals, the unicorn of the North.

Most of Greenland’s 56.000 inhabitants still live in small Inuit towns and settlements along the coast, and cling on to the traditions of hunting and fishery while facing the challenges of the 21st century. Roaming through such towns and talking with local people is an experience which will touch you deeply.

Most of Greenland’s 56.000 inhabitants still live in small Inuit towns and settlements along the coast, and cling on to the traditions of hunting and fishery while facing the challenges of the 21st century. Roaming through such towns and talking with local people is an experience which will touch you deeply.

Most of Greenland is located above the Arctic circle and experiences the eternal golden glow of the midnight sun during the summer months. Once the nights grow darker from the second half of August onwards, the ghostly northern lights hover through the sky. South Greenland is located in the ‘Aurora belt’, and is one of the best regions on earth to witness this fascinating, bewildering natural light show.

Most of Greenland is located above the Arctic circle and experiences the eternal golden glow of the midnight sun during the summer months. Once the nights grow darker from the second half of August onwards, the ghostly northern lights hover through the sky. South Greenland is located in the ‘Aurora belt’, and is one of the best regions on earth to witness this fascinating, bewildering natural light show.

And oh yes, last but not least. There is more you should know. In general, the North is not renown for its nice weather. If that is what you were thinking, Greenland will prove you wrong. Summers are mostly warm, dry and sunny, and more often than not you will find yourself hiking in T-shirt under a brilliantly blue sky with temperatures up to 20 degrees in the inner fjords.  Many places in West Greenland – Puffins’ main hub – have more sunshine hours and less precipitation than Southern France during the Summer months!

And oh yes, last but not least. There is more you should know. In general, the North is not renown for its nice weather. If that is what you were thinking, Greenland will prove you wrong. Summers are mostly warm, dry and sunny, and more often than not you will find yourself hiking in T-shirt under a brilliantly blue sky with temperatures up to 20 degrees in the inner fjords.  Many places in West Greenland – Puffins’ main hub – have more sunshine hours and less precipitation than Southern France during the Summer months!

So, forget about Norway or Iceland. Greenland is your next level. And at least you know the weather will be good.

THE BIRD ITHE WORD

Follow our adventures before, during and after the expeditions: